American Hog-peanut, Amphicarpaea bracteata

With attractive trifoliate leaves and the ability to fix nitrogen, American hog-peanut is a vigorous annual vine that twines around neighboring plants – making it welcome in some places, but usually considered a weed in ornamental landscapes. It is a somewhat unusual plant because it produces two types of flowers and seeds. Learn more about this North American native in the pea family in this article…

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Dodder, Cuscuta spp.

Tangles of pale yellow or bright orange strings running amok over other plants may remind you of science fiction tales, but there are actually real plants that grow like this. The nearly leafless, stringlike stems of dodder can be seen occasionally on a wide variety of plants in different habitats. Learn more about the biology of these parasitic plants that depend on their host plants for nutrition in this article…

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Carpetweed, Mollugo verticillata

Carpetweed lives up to its common name by quickly forming a flat mat over the ground. This prostrate summer annual has freely branching stems with whorls of green leaves at the widely spaced nodes. It is most common in disturbed areas – gardens, new or thin lawns, and roadsides. Find out more about this common weed in this article…

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Field Pennycress, Thlapsi arvense

There are many weedy plants in the mustard family. It would be easy to overlook field pennycress early in the season, but once the distinctive seed pods develop with a bottle-brush-like appearance, and especially once they start to dry, this plant becomes much more noticeable. Learn more about this introduced weed by reading this article…

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Dandelion, Taraxacum officinale

Those cheerful yellow flowers are everywhere in spring. Dandelion is a European species that has made itself at home throughout North America. A menace to gardeners and homeowners looking for a lush, green lawn, this plant can also be cultivated or foraged as food. You can find out more about this ubiquitous weed in this article…

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Yellow Goatsbeard, Tragopogon spp.

Have you noticed yellow flowers blooming individually on tall, scraggly stems or fluffy seed heads like extra-large dandelions along the roadside? There are two species of Tragopogon, introduced weeds that both have the common name yellow goatsbeard and are both common in disturbed areas. To learn more about these plants read this article…

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Spotted Spurge, Chamaesyce (=Euphorbia) maculata

You’ve likely seen flat, mat-like plants spreading in your garden, on the roadside, or maybe even growing from the cracks in the driveway. This is most likely spotted spurge, a native plant with weedy characteristics. To learn more about this annual plant in spurge family (of which poinsettia is a member), read this article… 

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Chicory, Cichorium intybus

Do you recognize those blue flowers along the roadside that will keep blooming until frost (if not mowed off)? That’s chicory, an escaped, naturalized European plant that has been used for food and forage since ancient times, although most Americans know it just as a weed. To learn more about Chicorium intybus, read this article… 

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Henbit, Lamium amplexicaule

With small but pretty pink flowers, henbit might be considered an ornamental plant, but is a weed for most people. This introduced relative of the more-refined, perennial spotted deadnettle (Lamium maculatum) that is commonly cultivated in gardens is an annual or winter annual. To learn more about this plant, read this article…

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Common Purslane, Portulaca oleracea

Portulaca oleracea is a low-growing plant with succulent leaves. This annual grows quickly to produce a mat of tart-flavored edible leaves. Because of its fast growth, prolific seed production, and ability to survive in all types of soils, most people think of it as a pest, but some consider it a vegetable. To learn more about this edible weed, read this article…

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