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Guinea Hen Flower, Fritillaria meleagris

Looking for an unusual spring flowering bulb? Guinea hen flower sports a variable, checkered pattern on the nodding, bell-shaped flowers that are only about 2 inches long.  The dark colored flowers (shades of red, pink or purple) are best sited where they can be appreciated up close. Learn more about Fritillaria meleagris by reading this article…

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Cutleaf Toothwort, Cardamine concatenata

Cutleaf toothwort is one several woodland plants that are harbingers of spring with their early flowers. Although small, this charming spring ephemeral is eye-catching with its distinctive leaves and soft white flowers. Easy to grow, it’s a great addition to any woodland garden, or to just appreciate the colonies that fill many natural areas. Learn more about this native species by reading this article…

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Skunk cabbage, Symplocarpus foetidus

Skunk cabbage is one of the first plants to bloom in the spring, with odd flowers like something from a science-fiction movie. The plant can bloom when there is still snow on the ground. The bizarre flowers are followed by huge rosettes of broad leaves that disappear by summer. Read this article to learn more about this interesting native plant…

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Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’

Looking for a low-maintenance, fall-blooming perennial? The Perennial Plant Association’s Perennial of the Year 2016 could be just the ticket.  With pure white flowers held on wiry stems well above dark green mounds of foliage, Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ makes a statement in the fall garden. To learn more about this great ornamental, read this article…

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Switch Grass, Panicum virgatum

Ornamental grasses are a great addition to the landscape. Switchgrass is a North American prairie native that adapts readily to the garden, especially several cultivars that have been selected for their attractive shape or color. Learn about this low-maintenance, warm season grass with airy, pink-tinged flower spikes in this article…

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Virginia Creeper, Parthenocissus quinquefolia

This time of year the leaves of Virginia creeper turn from an average green to a brilliant crimson red, painting tree trunks and the ground on woodland edges with bright color once temperatures cool. Learn more about this vigorous native vine that adapts to many different conditions and soils in this article…

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Anise hyssop, Agastache foeniculum

Anise hyssop is a great plant for attracting bees, butterflies and beetles. Easy to grow and often blooming from seed the first year, this short-lived perennial offers purple-blue flowers and fragrant foliage for ornamental or herb gardens, but is also at home in prairies and meadows. Learn more about this native species in this article…

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Balm-leaved Red Deadnettle, Lamium orvala

Not all Lamiums are created alike. The European species L. orvala is a tall, clump-forming plant with whorls of spotted purple-pink flowers that resemble orchids in spring. When the flowers fade the big leaves provide good contrast to grassy or fine-textured foliage in the garden. To learn more about this species of ornamental plant, read this article…

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Dandelion, Taraxacum officinale

Those cheerful yellow flowers are everywhere in spring. Dandelion is a European species that has made itself at home throughout North America. A menace to gardeners and homeowners looking for a lush, green lawn, this plant can also be cultivated or foraged as food. You can find out more about this ubiquitous weed in this article…

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Ramps, Allium tricoccum

There aren’t many native woodland plants that also double as vegetables, but the spring ephemeral Allium tricoccum is one. Commonly known as ramps or wild leek, this native onion species is frequently collected and sold at farmers markets or served in upscale restaurants. To find out more about this perennial plant, read this article…

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