Invasive Plants

One in the Plants Plus Series – a remix of past training presentations, printed materials and other references focused on specific plants or topics to help you increase your knowledge so you can better answer homeowner questions. To get two hours of continuing education credit for watching the video presentations and reading the articles, just complete the short quiz! This Plants Plus package focuses on invasive plants.

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Sweet Autumn Clematis, Clematis terniflora

With billowy masses of fragrant white flowers, sweet autumn clematis makes a statement in the late-season garden when few other plants are blooming. However, this non-native plant does self-seed aggressively and is considered an invasive species in many parts of the East and Midwest. Learn more about Clematis terniflora in this article…

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Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle, Harmonia axyridis

During the growing season multicolored Asian lady beetles are voracious predators of aphids, but when the weather gets cool they congregate to overwinter in cracks and crevices – often times on buildings or in homes.  To learn more about this introduced species that can be both an important natural enemy and a nuisance pest, read this article…

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Water Lettuce, Pistia stratiotes

Water gardens are a fun addition to the landscape, allowing for the inclusion of many unusual aquatic plants. Water lettuce is a floating tropical water plant with fuzzy rosettes resembling small (inedible) heads of lettuce. To learn more about this attractive ornamental that can be a serious weed under certain conditions, read this article… 

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Teasel, Dipsacus spp.

Have you noticed large swaths of road edges taken over by tall, prickly-looking plants in your area? The invasive weed called teasel is becoming more and more common in Wisconsin. Learn more about this escaped cultivated plant in this article…

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Creeping Bellflower, Campanula rapunculoides

Have you been invaded by a rather pretty bellflower – that just won’t go away? Campanula rapunculoides is a too-vigorous perennial native to Europe that can be considered a weed as it is both aggressive and difficult to eradicate. Learn more about this pretty pest in this article…

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Ox-eye Daisy, Leucanthemum vulgare

White daisy flowers dancing in the wind – pretty or just another pest? If it’s ox-eye daisy, Leucanthemum vulgare, beware! Although this introduced species is attractive when in bloom, it readily self seeds and can become a weed in turfgrass and in pastures if it escapes the garden. Read on to learn more about ox-eye daisy…

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Yellow toadflax, Linaria vulgaris

Yellow toadflax is a weedy Eurasian species of Linaria that has naturalized throughout the country. Although it has pretty yellow flowers, this perennial spreads by creeping rhizomes, making it difficult to control. Learn more about this plant in this article…

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Perennial Pepperweed, Lepidium latifolium

An invasive weed, perennial pepperweed, was found in Wisconsin in 2007. Fortunately the small infestation in the Green Bay area was eliminated, but MGVs and the public need to be on the alert for this problematic plant so that it can be dealt with early if other populations are found in our state. Learn more about what pepperweed looks like and the problems it causes in this article…

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