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Storing Tender “Bulbs” for Winter

This time of year frost is bound to nip non-hardy plants still outdoors. If you have any of the tender “bulbs” (plants which grow from fleshy storage structures even if they aren’t technically true bulbs) you’ll need to get those into storage for the winter soon. Find out more about preparing these plants to save for the next growing season in this article…

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‘Stargazer’ Lily

Almost everyone knows the ‘Stargazer’ lily. This hybrid Oriental lily was introduced in 1978 and still is one of the most popular cultivars today. To learn more about this gorgeous, easy-to-grow plant, read this article on “Stargazer’ Lily …

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Easter Lily, Lilium longiflorum

You can readily find Easter lilies in bloom at this time of year. This hardy bulb is forced out of season to provide floral displays for this holiday. Whether you want these fragrant flowers to brighten your home at this time of year, or would just like to have them bloom in your garden at their normal time, this is a plant well worth getting to know. Read on to learn more about Lilium longiflorum

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Peacock Orchid, Gladiolus murielae (=Acidantherus bicolor)

Here’s a plant in the iris family disguised as an orchid – peacock orchid, that is. Despite the common name, this is a species of Gladiolus that is easily grown as a tender summer bulb in our climate. And the bonus is that it’s fragrant! Learn more about this interesting flower here…

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Snowdrops, Galanthus spp.

The delicate white flowers and early bloom of these perennial bulbs (even pushing through the snow in cold areas) have given them the common name of snowdrops. Several of the 19 or so species of Galanthus are planted as ornamentals, with most hardy to zone 5, but some to zone 2. Learn more about this hardy group in the amaryllis family in this article…

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Glory-of-the-Snow, Chionodoxa forbesii

Light blue, upward facing flowers bloom early in the spring – sometimes even poking out of the snow, giving rise to the common name glory-of-the-snow. Chionodoxa forbesii is a great addition to gardens in beds, for naturalizing or mixed in a lawn. This small bulb combines well with other spring bulbs, too. Learn more about glory-of-the-snow in this article…

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Winter Aconite, Eranthis hyemalis

This early spring bloomer produces bright yellow flowers close to the ground. This plant in the buttercup family is one of the earlierst “bulbs” to bloom in spring. It’s actually not a true bulb, but a tuberous perennial. It is right at home in rock gardens, flower beds and woodland gardens. To find out more about this pretty harbinger of spring, read this article…

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Siberican Squill, Scilla siberica

Siberian squill (Scilla siberica) is one of the first of the spring-flowering bulbs to brighten up the landscape in early spring. Despite the name, it is not from Siberia, but from other areas of Russia and Eurasia – but is still very cold hardy. To learn about this very tough plant with bright blue flowers, read this article…

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