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Updates from our Blog

Articles on Some Flowering Tropical Plants

It’s pretty cold outside in our area, and most plants here have stopped growing for the season. But plants from tropical climates never have to deal with winter, and generally don’t drop their leaves and go dormant — making them ideal candidates to join us indoors for the winter (or to be grown as seasonal outdoor plants during the summer). Read about a few tropical plants grown for their flowers in these archived articles…

American hog-peanut, Amphicarpaea bracteata

With attractive trifoliate leaves and the ability to fix nitrogen, American hog-peanut is a vigorous annual vine that twines around neighboring plants – making it welcome in some places, but usually considered a weed in ornamental landscapes. It is a somewhat unusual plant because it produces two types of flowers and seeds. Learn more about this North American native in the pea family in this article…

Dodder, Cuscuta spp.

Tangles of pale yellow or bright orange strings running amok over other plants may remind you of science fiction tales, but there are actually real plants that grow like this. The nearly leafless, stringlike stems of dodder can be seen occasionally on a wide variety of plants in different habitats. Learn more about the biology of these parasitic plants that depend on their host plants for nutrition in this article…

Articles on Non-hardy Plants with Interesting Foliage

Many of our ornamental plants are grown primarily for their attractive foliage, rather than their flowers. Among the vast array of plants that won’t survive our winters, here are a few that you might want to consider growing as houseplants or seasonally outdoors. Read about six different frost-tender plants with pretty leaves in these archived articles:

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