Perennials

user warning: Got error 134 from storage engine query: SELECT data, created, headers, expire, serialized FROM cache_menu WHERE cid = 'links:primary-links:tree-data:db2b1b6da114b4d406b190c73b77c237' in /Volumes/Macintosh HD2/Drupal616/includes/cache.inc on line 26.

Hosta of the Year 2012: 'Liberty'

Each year the American Hosta Growers Association chooses one plant to feature as the Hosta of the Year. For 2012, this honor is bestowed on ‘Liberty', a slow-growing, mid-sized plant with dramatically vareigated leaves. It is a patented sport of another very popular variety, 'Sagae'. Find out more about this cultivar in this article...

Lamiastrum galeobdolon, Yellow Archangel

Yellow archangel is a hardy perennial in the mint family related to Lamium (deadnettles). Generally only variegated cultivars of this plant are grown, primarily for their foliage, although they do have interesting flowers for a short time every year. To learn more about Lamiastrum galeobdolon, read this article...

Chicory, Cichorium intybus

Do you recognize those blue flowers along the roadside that will keep blooming until frost (if not mowed off)? That's chicory, an escaped, naturalized European plant that has been used for food and forage since ancient times, although most Americans know it just as a weed. To learn more about Chicorium intybus, read this article... 

Erythronium ‘Pagoda’

With big yellow flowers, the Erythronium hybrid 'Pagoda' is a great addition to shady gardens. Developed from two species of native North American wildflowers, this spring bloomer will naturalize in woodland gardens and combines well with bleeding heart, columbine and hostas. To learn more about this garden ornamental, read this article... 

Bloodroot, Sanguinaria canadensis

Early spring bloomers are much appreciated after a long, cold winter. Bloodroot is one of the first wildflowers to open its bright white flowers in Midwestern woodlands. This native plant is at home in deciduous forests and in gardens where appropriate conditions can be provided. To learn more about this spring wildflower, read this article...

Brunnera macrophylla ‘Jack Frost’

Brunnera macrophylla ‘Jack Frost’ has been chosen by the Perennial Plant Association as their Plant of the Year 2012. With light blue flowers in spring and bright, silvery, crackled-looking foliage that really shines in the shade, this plant is a great addition to most gardens. You can find out more about this special cultivar by reading this article...

NGB’s Perennial of the Year 2012: Heuchera

The National Garden Bureau is shining a spotlight on Heuchera as their first ever perennial of the year. This native American genus of more than 50 species from a variety of habitats offers a plethora of leaf forms and foliage color, and plant breeders are extending the range even more. To learn about this great group of plants, read this article...

Blue Fescue, Festuca ovina glauca

Ornamental grasses are a common addition to many landscapes. Festuca ovina glauca – blue fescue or sheep fescue – is a low clumping species with blue-green foliage. This cool season grass can be used as a specimen or in masses. To find out more about this attractive grass, read this article...

Solomon’s Seal, Polygonatum spp.

Solomon’s seals are woodland plants with arching stems. There are a number of both native and exotic species and cultivars that are used primarily as foliage plants in ornamental shade gardens (as their small hanging flowers are attractive, but relatively inconspicuous). To learn more about the genus Polygonatum read this article...

Stachys byzantina ‘Big Ears’

Lamb’s ears (Stachys byzantina) are a good addition to Midwestern gardens for their silvery foliage. One cultivar that stands out is ‘Big Ears’ for it’s extra large leaves. The leaves of this one aren’t quite as silver as many others, but it offers bold texture in a low mounding plant. To learn more about this big-leafed beauty, read this article...

Search